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Webinars

E-TEAM

Els for Autism is proud to present our E-Learning series. Join us for online learning webinars covering a variety of topics on autism spectrum disorder.  Contact Dr. Jessica Weber jessica.weber@elsforautism.org to inquire about leading our next online webinar.

 

Upcoming Webinars

No new webinars currently scheduled.  Please check back at a later date.

Free Webinars

Free learning webinars covering a variety of topics on autism spectrum disorder Registration is not required. Click the link provided below and you will automatically enter the E-TEAM virtual classroom.

Adults

Employment for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder:  A Training for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors

Dr. Marlene Sotelo, BCBA-D, MT-BC,  Director of Programs and Operations, Els for Autism Foundation
Dr. Kerri Morse, Ed.D., Adult Services Coordinator, Els for Autism Foundation
Erin Lozott, M.S., CCC-SLP, Director of Clinical Services, Els for Autism Foundation
Hannah Brammer, M.S., CF-SLP, Speech Language Pathologist, Els for Autism Foundation
Andrea Martin, Transition Specialist
Jen Smyth, Licensed Mental Health Counselor
Dr. Jessica Weber, BCBA-D, Behavior Services Coordinator, Els for Autism Foundation
Dr. Toby Honsberger, Executive Director, Renaissance Learning Academy

Enhancing Independent Task Performance of Adults with Developmental Disabilities

Dr. Kerri Morse, Ed.D., Adult Services Coordinator, Els for Autism Foundation

Assessments

Assessing Children with ASD in a Variety of Healthcare Settings

Leani Gilbert, RN, EMT

Comprehensive Assessment for ASD: What Are We Doing and Why? 

Cheryl Klaiman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Division of Autism and Related Disorders, Emory University School of Medicine
Senior Psychologist, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

What’s Next? Understanding an Autism Spectrum Diagnosis 

Rachel Gardner, M.A., LP, Director, Fraser Autism Center of Excellence

Behavior Strategies

Behavior Basics

Dr. Jessica Weber, BCBA-D, Behavior Services Coordinator, Els for Autism Foundation

What’s the Function: Understanding Behavior

Anibal Gutierrez, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Associate Director, Center for Autism and Related Disabilities, University of Miami, Department of Psychology

Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Adaptive Behavior Profiles for ASD:  Implications for Functional Outcome

Celine A. Saulnier, Ph.D. – Director Research Operations, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
Associate Professor, Division of Autism & Related Disorders, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine

Autism 101

Dr. Marlene Sotelo, BCBA-D, MT-BC, Director of Programs and Operations, Els for Autism Foundation

Early Identification of Autism Spectrum Disorder 

Sally Fuhrmeister, M.S., CCC-SLP

Understanding Sensory Processing in ASD

Amy Wagenfeld, Ph.D., OTR/L, SCEM, CAPS, Research Coordinator

Communication & Assistive Technology

Communication All Day Long

Erin Lozott, M.S., CCC-SLP, Director of Clinical Services, Els for Autism Foundation

Language

Receptive Language Skills: Addressing Faulty Stimulus Control

Yvonne Lam, M.A., BCBA

Receptive language involves a learner responding to the vocal verbal behavior of others (Grow & LeBlanc,2013). Deficits in receptive language may result in challenges in a variety of other skill areas such as academics (e.g., reading, writing, and math) and social skills (e.g., following simple instructions, responding to one’s name, receptive identification by name, feature, function and class). While teaching receptive language skills, errors related to faulty stimulus control are particularly problematic. This webinar will review antecedent-based approaches and consequence-based approaches (i.e., error correction procedures) that are often used to address persistent errors and/or faulty stimulus control.

Miscellaneous

An Architecture for Autism: the ASPECTSS™ of Autism-Friendly Spaces

Magda Mostafa, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Design, The American University in Cairo, Design Associate, Progressive Architects

Anxiety & Learning

Tanya Sanchez, MS, CCC-SLP, BCBA, FEL

The Power of Music as a Therapeutic Tool

Dr. Marlene Sotelo, BCBA-D, MT-BC, Director of Programs and Operations, Els for Autism Foundation

Sensory Integration & Self-Regulation

Wendy Jacobo, MOT, OTR/L

Sexuality Education for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders Overview

Kim Spence, Ph.D., Coordinator of Educational and Training Programs, Center for Autism and Related Disabilities (CARD), University of Central Florida

Understanding Medications Used to Manage Disruptive Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Jerean Casey Grau, PharmD, BCPP, MS of PsychoPharmacology, Clinical Pharmacy Specialist

Recreation

How to #GameON Autism Golf

Jen Hong, Golf Challenge Development Manager, Els for Autism Foundation

Skills Training

Potty Time

Dr. Jessica Weber, BCBA-D, Behavior Services Coordinator, Els for Autism Foundation

Safety Skills for Individuals with ASD

Dr. Toby Honsberger, Executive Director, Renaissance Learning Academy

Tasting Time

Heather Bowditch, OTR/L, MA, LMFT, Occupational Therapist, Christine Viggiano, MS, OTR/L, Occupational Therapist and Brittany Johansen, MA, CCC, Speech/Language Pathologist – The Center for Autism

Teaching Strategies

Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies for ASD

Dr. Christine Honsberger, MS, BCBA, Behavior Learning Services Specialist, Els for Autism Foundation

Paid Webinars

Paid webinars are presentations from the April 28th and 29th, 2017 Autism Innovations and Global Impact Conference: The State of the Science hosted by the Els for Autism Foundation.  Registration is required along with a fee of $40.00 per presentation.  Clink the link provided below to review the abstract and to attend the conference presentation.

Title: Community Engagement & Innovation: Lessons from Global Autism Research

Presented by: Dr. Andy Shih, Vice President of Scientific Affairs, Autism Speaks

Recorded: April 28th, 2017 at the Autism Innovations and Global Impact Conference: The State of the Science

Cost: $40.00

 

To register and purchase the presentation: click here.
Approximate length: 1 hour and 15 minutes

Abstract: Over 85% of individuals and families affected by autism live in low and middle-income countries with little or no access to effective support and services. Increased awareness and research in these communities in recent years have enhanced our understanding of the unmet needs and challenges and have led to innovations that could improve access to care and deliver better outcomes for affected individuals and their families. An overview of the global autism community will be presented, with an emphasis on programs, policies and barriers to progress, especially in low and middle-income countries. Emerging scientific approaches like implementation science and community-based participatory research (CBPR) will be explored to underscore the importance of community-engagement for developing and establishing feasible and sustainable programs and services. Several case studies will inform the discussion of these issues in greater depth.

Title: Culture and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Challenges and Opportunities in Diagnosis and Care

Presented by: Dr. Roy Richard Grinker, Professor and Chair Department of Anthropology, The George Washington University

Recorded: April 28th, 2017 at the Autism Innovations and Global Impact Conference: The State of the Science

Cost: $40.00

To register and purchase the presentation: click here.
Approximate length: 1 hour and 15 minutes

Abstract:
Constructivist approaches to health and illness do not deny that underlying biological condition produce particular behaviors, cognitive challenges and skills, and suffering. Rather they acknowledge that science builds models of behavior that are historically contingent, culturally constituted, and, like Asperger’s Disorder, sometimes temporary. In discussing science as a cultural formation that promotes and constrains scientific and popular definitions of ASD, this presentation highlights the role of culture in identification and treatment, and more generally at the intersection of scientific and local knowledge. Data gathered in Southern Africa, South Korea, and among minority communities in the eastern United States will be discussed in relation to three questions:

  1. What does it mean to say that a phenomenon is “cultural?”
  2. What are the cross-cultural commonalities and differences in how the constellation of features scientists call autism is defined and treated?
  3. What kinds of cross-cultural research methods can yield information relevant to improving early detection and intervention? In these very different settings, ASD is arguably under-diagnosed and under-reported.

The presentation will discuss the processes used to engage diverse communities in ASD research in the context of an epidemiological investigation of 7-12 year olds in South Korea, and the Early Autism Project, an ASD detection program for 18-36 month old Zulu-speaking children in South Africa. In South Korea and South Africa, local knowledge helped researchers to address ethnographic as well as practical problems. Researchers incorporated that knowledge as they engaged communities in a research protocol, adapted and translated screening and diagnostic tools, and developed methods for screening and evaluating children with ASD.

Title: Open Science and Large-scale Evaluations of the Intrinsic Brain Architecture in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Presented by: Dr. Adriana Di Martino, Associate Professor of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Research Director, Autism Spectrum Disorder Research & Clinical Program, The Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

Recorded: April 28th, 2017 at the Autism Innovations and Global Impact Conference: The State of the Science

Cost: $40.00

To register and purchase the presentation, click here.
Approximate length: 1 hour and 15 minutes

Abstract: This presentation will highlight the power of open science and the role of brain imaging to accelerate discovery of the neural mechanisms underlying autism spectrum disorder. Recent technical advancements in brain imaging represent an unprecedented opportunity to non-invasively examine the brain organization at both the level of individual brain regions and in terms of connections between regions. This is relevant because a variety of sources support models of autism as a condition characterized by disrupted connectivity among brain regions. Identifying the specific nature of the putative disconnections in autism is a challenging task; multiple neural circuit combinations can potentially be affected at any given developmental stage and the heterogeneity of autism introduces additional complexity. In response, open-data sharing is increasingly being encouraged to rapidly amass the large-scale datasets needed to confront heterogeneity, engage a broader range of scientific disciplines, and facilitate independent replications. The Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) has brought the model of open data sharing into brain imaging of autism by: 1) launching the first open-access brain imaging repository aggregating over 1000 datasets of individuals with autism and comparisons from multiple international institutions in 2012 and 2) enhancing the ABIDE data repository in size and characterization in 2016. An overview of the primary results emerging from these groundbreaking initiative will highlight emerging concepts and reveal the differential role of brain systems in the physiopathology of both core symptoms and comorbid psychopathology in autism.

Title: Expect More: An Autism Adventure

Presented by: Honorable Mike Lake, Member of Parliament Edmonton-Wetaskiwin, Canada

Recorded: April 29th, 2017 at the Autism Innovations and Global Impact Conference: The State of the Science

Cost: $40.00

To register and purchase the presentation: click here.
Approximate length: 1 hour and 15 minutes

Abstract: In his ten years as a Member of Parliament, Mr. Lake has had many unique opportunities to raise awareness of autism. He’s spoken to spouses of world leaders at the United Nations in New York City; traveled to London, Paris, Geneva and Washington to speak with fellow elected officials from across the political spectrum; and addressed global leaders at the World Health Organization and in the international research community. Mr. Lake’s presentation uses video clips from interviews and news stories centered around his 20-year-old son, Jaden, who has autism. In the end, his goal is to use Jaden’s personal story to change the way we think about the people around us – their abilities, their challenges and the unique contributions that they can make to the great benefit of all of us.

Title: What Can We Learn from Longitudinal Studies about Intervention and Progress?

Presented by: Dr. Catherine Lord, Director, Center for Autism and the Developing Brain, New York Presbyterian Hospital; Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medicine

Recorded: April 29th, 2017 at the Autism Innovations and Global Impact Conference: The State of the Science

Cost: $40.00

To register and purchase the presentation: click here.
Approximate length: 1 hour and 15 minutes

Abstract: As the number of preschool children identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) increases each year, so too will the number of children with ASD moving into adolescence. The aims of the research are to determine predictors of adolescent and adult outcome measured in adaptive skills, quality of life, positive mood, behavior problems and symptoms of anxiety and depression. The project represents a shift in emphasis from attention primarily on negative outcomes to consideration of coping strategies for individuals and families and their impact on well-being and independence. The natural history of behavioral, cognitive, language and social development from ages 2 to 19 are examined in two well-described samples of children from North Carolina and Chicago originally referred for possible ASD, and a group of non-spectrum developmentally delayed controls. One hundred eighty-seven out of 213 original children currently remain in the Early Diagnosis study initially funded by NIMH and NICHD. These children were seen at ages 2, 3, 5 and 9. Their families have participated in phone interviews and completed packets of questionnaires when the children were between 11 and 18 years with a focus on relationships among adaptive skills, behavior problems, pubertal development and adolescent onset of seizures. Face to face interviews and assessments from age 10 to 26 have been conducted so we have new results about what adults are now doing and experiencing. We hope these studies can provide important information about individual differences in developmental trajectories in ASD and the factors that contribute to positive and negative aspects of outcome in adolescents and young adults.

Title: Developmental Social Neuroscience Meets Public Health Challenge: A New System of Healthcare Delivery for Infants and Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Presented by: Dr. Ami Klin, Director, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar Professor & Chief, Division of Autism and Related Disorders Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine Center for Translational Social Neuroscience, Emory University

Recorded: April 29th, 2017 at the Autism Innovations and Global Impact Conference: The State of the Science

Cost: $40.00

To register and purchase the presentation: click here.
Approximate length: 1 hour and 15 minutes

Abstract: This presentation highlights the critical role of early diagnosis and intervention in attenuating the symptoms of autism. Data will be presented on early diagnostic indicators obtained through eye-tracking-based behavioral assays that quantify the social disabilities in autism. The results of these assays were used to generate “growth charts” of normative social engagement, and the deviations from the norm were taken as early indicators of risk. These methods yielded high sensitivity and specificity for the screening of infants. The ultimate goal of this effort is to develop objectified and quantified tools for the detection of autism in infancy, tools that might be deployed in primary care and pediatricians’ offices. This work will be contextualized in terms of recent developmental social neuroscience research with toddlers with autism, which implicated developmentally very early emerging, and evolutionarily highly conserved, mechanisms of social adaptation that set the stage for reciprocal social interaction, which in term represent the platform for early social brain development. Effective screening of infants would be unethical without a clinical infrastructure providing access to family support and early intervention for those screened positive. Through a collaboration with Dr. Amy Wetherby, we are now establishing tools and procedures for the full integration of primary care physicians and early intervention providers with the goal of establishing a new system of healthcare delivery for infants & toddlers with autism spectrum disorders.

Title: Google, Facebook, FaceTime and the Electric Developing Social Brain

Presented by: Dr. Roberto Tuchman, Director of Neurology at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital & Miami Children’s Health System; Clinical Professor of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, & Behavioral Health FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Recorded: April 29th, 2017 at the Autism Innovations and Global Impact Conference: The State of the Science

Cost: $40.00

To register and purchase the presentation: click here.
Approximate length: 1 hour and 15 minutes

Abstract: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and neurological disorders such as epilepsy commonly co-occur. The overlap of ASD and epilepsy is greatest in those with intellectual disability (ID). However, intellectual function as defined by IQ, is not the only determining factor as children with ASD with normal IQ are also at increased risk of developing epilepsy, compared to children without ASD. In addition, children with epilepsy without ID are at increased risk of social cognitive impairments. The dynamic relationship between ASD, epilepsy, and ID suggests that we should move beyond diagnostic categorization, and consider the importance of social cognitive function across disorders of brain function. Conceptualizing non-social cognitive function as the “Google” brain, social cognitive function as the “Facebook” brain, and educational-behavioral and communication interventions as “Facetime” provides a clinical framework to understand and discuss behaviorally defined disorders of brain function. The behavioral manifestations of abnormal social cognitive development can be recognized early in development based on atypical nonverbal communication, such as response to and initiation of joint attention, affective reciprocity, and often excessive focus on objects instead of social information such as faces or the actions of people. In its most severe form these behaviors are easily recognized, but there is a wide spectrum of developmental competence of these early social skills with varying impact on overall neurodevelopment. Early recognition of atypical development of social skills, and implementation of behavioral-educational interventions to mitigate the negative impact of atypical development of social cognitive function has important implications for a diverse group of disorders of the brain. Furthermore, emerging knowledge of the molecular and electro-chemical circuitry common to ASD, epilepsy, and ID, informs us of targets of pharmacological interventions with the potential to positively impact the electric developing social brain.